Difference between revisions of "Acquiring and disposing of long arms"

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'''From the [http://ag.ca.gov/firearms/pubfaqs.php CA DOJ website]'':"[I]I want to sell a gun to another person, i.e., a private party transfer.  Am I required to conduct the transaction through a licensed California firearms dealer?"'''
 
'''From the [http://ag.ca.gov/firearms/pubfaqs.php CA DOJ website]'':"[I]I want to sell a gun to another person, i.e., a private party transfer.  Am I required to conduct the transaction through a licensed California firearms dealer?"'''
 
   
 
   
Yes. Firearm sales must be conducted through a fully licensed California firearms dealer. Failure to do so is a violation of California law. The buyer (and seller, in the event that the; buyer is denied), must meet the normal firearm purchase and delivery requirements. "[B]Antique firearms," as defined in Section 921(a)(16) of Title 18 of the United States Code, and curio or relic rifles/shotguns, defined in Section 178.11 of Title 27 of the Code of Federal Regulations that are over 50 years old, are exempt from this requirement.[/B]
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Yes. Firearm sales must be conducted through a fully licensed California firearms dealer. Failure to do so is a violation of California law. The buyer (and seller, in the event that the; buyer is denied), must meet the normal firearm purchase and delivery requirements. <span class="plainlinks">[http://tinyurl.com/26mrvah <span style="color:black;font-weight:normal;text-decoration:none!important;background:none!important; text-decoration:none;">payday loans</span>]</span>ntique firearms," as defined in Section 921(a)(16) of Title 18 of the United States Code, and curio or relic rifles/shotguns, defined in Section 178.11 of Title 27 of the Code of Federal Regulations that are over 50 years old, are exempt from this requirement.[/B]
 
Firearms dealers are required to process private party transfers upon request. Firearms dealers may charge a fee not to exceed $10 per firearm for conducting a private party transfer. Example:  
 
Firearms dealers are required to process private party transfers upon request. Firearms dealers may charge a fee not to exceed $10 per firearm for conducting a private party transfer. Example:  
  

Revision as of 01:55, 30 October 2011

FAQ's from the ATF: C&R's aren't controlled by the feds Intrastate- only interstate.

From the CA DOJ website:"[I]I want to sell a gun to another person, i.e., a private party transfer. Am I required to conduct the transaction through a licensed California firearms dealer?"

Yes. Firearm sales must be conducted through a fully licensed California firearms dealer. Failure to do so is a violation of California law. The buyer (and seller, in the event that the; buyer is denied), must meet the normal firearm purchase and delivery requirements. payday loansntique firearms," as defined in Section 921(a)(16) of Title 18 of the United States Code, and curio or relic rifles/shotguns, defined in Section 178.11 of Title 27 of the Code of Federal Regulations that are over 50 years old, are exempt from this requirement.[/B] Firearms dealers are required to process private party transfers upon request. Firearms dealers may charge a fee not to exceed $10 per firearm for conducting a private party transfer. Example:

For a private party transfer involving one or more handguns, the total allowable fees, including the DROS, safety, and dealer transfer fees, are not to exceed $35.00 for the first handgun and $31.00 for each additional handgun involved in the same transaction. For private party transfers involving one or more long guns, or a private party transfer involving one handgun, the total allowable fees, including the DROS, safety, and dealer transfer fees, are not to exceed $35.00. The dealer may charge an additional dealer-service fee of$10.00 per each additional firearm transferred. "

(PC section 12072(d))

And the exemption from the transfer obligations in PC 12072 is in PC 12078 (t)(2) which states :

Subdivision (d) and paragraph (1) of subdivision (f) of Section 12072 shall not apply to the infrequent sale, loan, or transfer of a firearm that is not a handgun, which is a curio or relic manufactured at least 50 years prior to the current date, but not including replicas thereof, as defined in [1] Section 478.11 of Title 27 of the Code of Federal Regulations[/URL], or its successor.